Kimuu

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Kimuu

Kimuu

Location of Kimuu

Coordinates: 0°46′S 39°00′E / 0.77°S 39°E / -0.77; 39Coordinates: 0°46′S 39°00′E / 0.77°S 39°E / -0.77; 39

Country
Kenya

Province
Eastern Province

Time zone
EAT (UTC+3)

Kimuu is a settlement in Kenya’s Eastern Province.
References[edit]

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t
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Margaret Stones

Elsie Margaret Stones AM, MBE (born 28 August 1920 at Colac, Victoria) is an Australian botanical illustrator.[1] Stones worked as principal contributing artist to Curtis’s Botanical Magazine from 1950 to 1981.[2] Between 1958 and 1983 she had produced more than 400 watercolor drawings for the magazine.[1]
In 1957 she was commissioned to prepare a set of floral designs for Australian postage stamps.[1]
Stones worked closely with Winifred Curtis between 1967 and 1978 in providing the illustrations for The Endemic Flora of Tasmania.
In 1976, Stones was commissioned to create a series of six watercolors as part of Louisiana State University’s celebration of the American bicentennial.[3] The project’s scope was soon expanded, and over the next fourteen years, Stones and a team of LSU botanists traveled throughout the state gathering plant specimens. She eventually completed more than 200 drawings, which were published by the LSU Press in 1991 as Flora of Louisiana. The original drawings, as well as selected working drawings, are now held in the LSU Libraries Special Collections in Hill Memorial Library.[4]
She was awarded a silver Veitch Memorial Medal in 1976 and a gold Veitch Memorial Medal in 1985 by the Royal Horticultural Society.[5]
Stones has two genera named after her, Stonesia and Stonesiella.[6]
References[edit]

^ a b c “Stones, Elsie Margaret (Margaret) (1920 – )”. Bright Sparcs. Retrieved 2009-10-08. 
^ “Stones, Elsie Margaret (1920-)”. Australian National Herbarium. 13 November 2007. Retrieved 2009-10-08. 
^ Native Flora of Louisiana: Watercolor Drawings by Margaret Stones, Louisiana Digital Library, Baton Rouge, La. <http://cdm16313.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/landingpage/collection/MSW/> (accessed 2 February 2015)
^ “Native Flora of Louisiana: Watercolor Drawings by Margaret Stones,” LSU Libraries Special Collections website.
^ “RHS Green Manual”. RHS. Retrieved 23 December 2016. 
^ Morgan, H. (25 November 2002). “Stones, Elsie (Margaret) (1920 – )”. The Australian Women’s Register. Retrieved 2009-10-08. 

Further reading[edit]

Zdanowicz, Irena (1996). Beauty in Truth: the Botanical Art of Margaret Stones. Victoria: National Gallery of Victoria. 

External links[edit]

Native Flora of Louisiana: Watercolor Drawings by Margaret Stones, Louisiana Digital Library, Baton Rouge, La. (accessed 2 February 2015) <http://cdm16313.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/search/collection/MSW>

Authority control

WorldCat Identities

1930–31 SK Rapid Wien season

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Rapid Wien

1930-31 season

Coach
Eduard Bauer

Stadium
Pfarrwiese,
Vienna, Austria

First class
3rd

Austrian Cup
7th (tournament held in league mode)

Mitropa Cup
Winner (1st title)

Top goalscorer
League: Franz Weselik (16)
All: Franz Weselik (25)

Highest home attendance
40,000

Lowest home attendance
1,000

Average home league attendance
10,500

← 1929–30
1931–32 →

The 1930-31 SK Rapid Wien season was the 33rd season in club history.

Contents

1 Squad

1.1 Squad and statistics[1]
1.2 Squad statistics

2 Fixtures and results[2]

2.1 League
2.2 Cup
2.3 Mitropa Cup

3 References

Squad[edit]
Squad and statistics[1][edit]
Squad statistics[edit]

Nat.
Name
League
Cup
Mitropa Cup
Total

Apps
Goals
Apps
Goals
Apps
Goals
Apps
Goals

Goalkeepers

Josef Bugala
16

7

6

29

Rudolf Raftl
2

2

4

Defenders

Leopold Czejka
18

5

6

29

Otto Karpfel

1

1

Roman Schramseis
17

7

6

30

Anton Witschel
1

5

6

Midfielders

Karl Rappan
13

6

6

25

Josef Smistik
18
2
9
1
6
1
33
4

Johann Vana
14

9

5

28

Franz Wagner
3

2

5

Forwards

Franz Binder
1
2
2

3
2

Johann Hoffmann
1

1
1

2
1

Hans Kaburek

2

2

Matthias Kaburek
18
14
7
5
6
4
31
23

Willibald Kirbes
15
7
5
1
6
1
26
9

Karl Langer
4
1
3

7
1

Johann Luef
16
12
5
2
4
3
25
17

Hans Pesser

2

2

Franz Schilling
3
3
3
4

6
7

Johann Schneider

1

1

Stefan Skoumal
6

2

2

10

Franz Smistik
6
2
4

1

11
2

Franz Weselik
17
16
6
6
6
3
29
25

Ferdinand Wesely
9
4
3
3
6
4
18
11

Fixtures and results[2][edit]
  Win   Draw   Loss
League[edit]

Rd
Date
Venue
Opponent
Res.
Att.
Goals and discipline

1
31.08.1930
A
Austria Wien
2-4
16,000
Weselik  31′  70′

2
07.09.1930
A
FAC
2-0
10,000
Weselik  66′, Luef  72′

3
14.09.1930
H
Wiener SC
4-0
7,000
Weselik  53′  77′, Wesely  57’ (pen.), Kaburek M.  75′

4
28.09.1930
A
Vienna
3-0
24,000
Weselik  20′  65′, Kirbes W.  52′

5
05.10.1930
H
Wiener AC
6-3
10,000
Kirbes W.  16′, Kaburek M.  34′  67′, Smistik J.  44′, Luef  59′, Wesely  80′

6
12.10.1930
A
Slovan Wien
4-1
18,000
Kaburek M

Chijavadze

Chijavadze (Georgian: ჩიჯავაძე) or Chizhavadze (ჩიჟავაძე) were a Georgian noble family (tavadi), prominent in the western kingdom of Imereti in the 16th and 17th centuries.
The Chijavadze of Imereti share origin with the Chichua, a noble family in neighboring Mingrelia. Their ancestors had settled in Kartli in the 10th century and then in Imereti in the mid-15th. The 20th-century historian Cyril Toumanoff considered them an offshoot of the medieval Kakhaberidze family of the Liparitid stock,[1] while Simon Janashia and, following him, several other Georgian authorities, viewed them as the continuation of the noble clan (aznauri) Sadzvereli (საზვერელი) known from the medieval Georgian chronicles to have helped George II of Abkhazia to seize his rebellious son, Constantine, in the 920s. Janashia corroborated his conclusion by the fact that “Sadzvereli”, probably originally a territorial epithet, later appeared as a male given name in the Chijavadze family on several occasions.[2] The surname Chijavadze itself is first recorded in the 15th-century documents.[3]
The princely fief of Chijavadze had formed by the early 16th century. It occupied most of the territory known as Sachino in what is now the Vani Municipality, with a principal castle at Sebeka. The family had a surge in prominence in the mid-17th century and then gradually went into decline, eventually losing most of their estates to Prince Mamuka of Imereti in the 1730s. Later in the 18th century, Prince Vakhushti Chijavadze was able to recover the family’s standing and holdings thanks to his close ties with King Solomon II of Imereti. After the Russian conquest of Imereti in 1810, the Chijavadze were incorporated into the Imperial Russian nobility and confirmed in their princely dignity (knyaz) in 1850.[4]
References[edit]

^ Toumanoff, Cyril (1949–51). “The Fifteenth-Century Bagratids and the Institution of Collegial Sovereignty in Georgia”. Traditio. 7: 176. 
^ Soselia, Olga (1973). “ჩიჯავაძეთა სათავადო [The Chijavadze Princedom]”. Georgian Association of Nobility (in Georgian). Retrieved 23 November 2014. 
^ Dumin, Stanislav, ed. (1996). Дворянские роды Российской империи. Том 3. Князья [Noble Families of the Russian Empire. Volume 3. The Princes] (in Russian). Moscow: Linkominvest. p. 246. ISBN 5861530041. 
^ Toumanoff, Cyril (1963). Studies